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current issues

Immediate Issues:
Blackfoot River Trail -- BBRK is working with Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) to establish the Big Blackfoot River Trail, a series of reservation-only campsites dedicated to float-in camping.  These will have no vehicle access, and will require recreationists to practice complete pack in/pack out, zero impact campcraft.

The initial program will cover campsites at four locations in the middle section of the drainage, creating a 40-mile stretch of river that can be floated in multiple days with the assurance of reserved campsets.

Under FWP's auspices, BBRK will help monitor the sites, provide public awareness of the program, and gather usage statistics to help planning for further expansion of the trail in subsequent years.  Details are still being finalized.  Stay tuned!

Ongoing Issues:
Stop the Keystone XL pipeline --  This enormous pipeline is proposed to run from Alberta's Tar Sands oil project across the US to Houston, TX, crossing eastern Montana in the process.  BBRK has joined a consortium of groups from both the US and Canada in a lawsuit to prevent this ecological, social, cultural and economic disaster-in-the-making from occurring.

Fight Against "Dirty Water" Laws -- Radical conservative elements in the US Congress are trying to push through a wide-ranging set of changes to enivronmental regulations, gutting the Clean Water Act and putting many other related programs at risk.  Bad enough the EPA budget is slashed 17%, but their blatant bowing to our biggest polluting industries boggle the mind.  For example, how can one justify a rule that makes it illegal for regulations to consider the impact of coal mine-based pollution on human health?

Future issues:

Aquatic insect baseline census -- While there is excellent information and ongoing monitoring of water and fisheries conditions on the Big Blackfoot, there is a significant void in our biological database of its aquatic entomology.  We'll work to initiate projects developing a baseline census of species populations of this important segment of the river's biological makeup.  We envision partnering with FWP and/or the University of Montana in this effort.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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