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The Big Blackfoot River just got some more great coverage!
October 10, 2016:  Friend of the Waterkeeper Alliance and professional photographer Lynne Buchanan recently toured many of the Riverkeeper programs in the Pacific Northwest including mine. This is her blog of her visit here, done from her Florida offices in the middle of Hurricane Matthew. That's dedication - thank you, Lynne!

Your Riverkeeper just published a new book!
 November 30, 2015:  Are you a novice or intermediate fly fisherman?  Or are you in that just-thinking-about-trying-it stage?  Either way, you will enjoy my new book "Fly Fishing for the Reasonably Competent".  As the name implies, this is written "for dummies", and it definitely does not take this wonderful pastime too seriously.  After decades of time on the water with a fly rod in my hand, I wanted to educate the newbie with only the information needed to get out on the water without feeling inferior or intimidated by that snooty guy with a couple grand worth of gear hanging off his vest.

You find no Latin terminology, no lengthy descriptions of arcane and unnecessary knots (you only need 3 of them and they're explained in simple words and photos), and a fair amount of light-hearted perspective to keep you grounded as you learn the basics. 

It's available by
clicking here or on the "check out my book" link on the left.  You can also order it on Amazon.com.  


US District Court Decision:  Colt Summit Project Approved!
 April 7, 2014:  One of the more curious environmental lawsuits was decided this week.  A wide range of environmental groups, including BBRK, joined forces with the logging industry to defend a proposed watershed restoration project in federal court. 


The Colt Summit Restoration and Fuels Reduction Project near Seeley Lake has an unfamiliar twist:  conservation groups, timber interests and government foresters - traditional adversaries - were all on the same side, united in defense of a project that will improve habitat for wildlife and fish, improve water quality in the Clearwater River (a major tributary of the Blackfoot), reduce fire danger, bolster a local economy and help create a healthier forest for future generations.

The project at issue is compelling. So is the painstaking collaborative process that led diverse interests to find common ground in the Lolo National Forest. A new day has dawned in Montana's forests, and no better proof exists than the broad coalition of groups rising in defense of the Colt Summit project.

Four contentious environmental groups that didn’t participate in the collaborative process filed suit against the Forest Service last September, seeking to stop the project.

  It’s hard to think of a better project than Colt Summit to place at the center of this contest because biologists at Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks have called the project “thoughtfully
planned out, grounded in good science, and long overdue.” The proposal calls for thinning and prescribed burning on about 2,000 acres of overgrown forest in the upper Clearwater River drainage to maintain or improve wildlife and fisheries habitat, provide for scenic vistas, and reduce fuels.

As part of this work, the Forest Service plans to remove and claim
more than 28 miles of roads, creating better security habitat for grizzly bears, lynx and other indigenous and endangered species. Several miles of roads will be rebuilt to move them away from Colt Creek, which is important as bull trout spawning habitat and as a wildlife corridor. The project also calls for controlling invasive weeds that threaten to overrun native vegetation important to wildlife.

  Montanans have endured decades of conflict over forest management. Our forests have languished, opportunities to conserve fish and wildlife have been lost and forest jobs have dwindled as warring parties fought to stalemate.

What we’ve discovered through the kind of collaborative efforts that produced the Colt Summit project is that we have more to gain by working together for better forest management than by perpetuating the battles of yore.



BBRK featured in article about "A River Runs Through It"

A 5/15/2013 feature article in the Missoulian commemorated the 75th anniversary of the death of Paul Maclean.  Paul was the son of Norman Maclean, author of that great American novella  "A River Runs Through It", subsequently brought to the screen by Robert Redford.  Paul was a key character in the semi-autobiographical story, with Brad Pitt playing Paul in the movie. 

The Big Blackfoot Riverkeeper was interviewed for the article, which attempts to determine the action spots on the river where three of the most memorable scenes took place 
in the book and movie:
                          
Missoulian article:  Famous Maclean fishing holes remain elusive

BBRK and the Blackfoot River Trail featured in western Montana media
The Blackfoot River Trail, a series of float-in only campsites along the middle section of the Blackfoot River, begins operation June 15, 2012.  This announcement has captured the interest of The Missoulian, The Missoula Independent and the Great Falls Tribune.
Read their coverage of the Trail here:
                                                       
 
The Missoulian article
                                                        The Independent article
                                                        The Great Falls Tribune article
 

Big Blackfoot Riverkeeper featured in The Independent
Our program was featured in an article about congressional efforts to weaken federal environmental regulations. 
                                                       Read the August 4, 2011 article here.

Judge issues Injunction against Montana DOT and Exxon, halting Big Rigs
July 19, 2011:    A Montana judge has issued a preliminary injunction against Montana DOT and ExxonMobil's plans to ship 207 "Big Rigs" through Montana, claiming a falilure of the state to seriously consider environmental impact of the project. 

Reconizing the formidable delays and costs to continue the fight, ExxonMobil effectively threw in the towel in early August by announcing plans to reconfigure the loads into smaller units to allow travel on Interstate highways. 

This was vindication for the Missoula County Commissioners, who led this controversial lawsuit.  Their efforts appear to have permanently halted the massive loads from turning the county and the Blackfoot watershed into a permanent high-wide transit corridor. 
                                                                              
Read the article here.

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